Posts tagged ‘Egyptian Revolution’

2011/03/03

Analysis: Revolutions, Regime Change, and State Collapse in the Arab World

[Ed. Note: The commentary below, abridged from the original available at the Carnegie Middle East Center, provides an important overview of events unfolding throughout the Middle East and North Africa and should serve to temper those swept up in the emotional exuberance of the Arab Awakening and its potential to reorder the lives of millions. The link to the full article is available at the end.]

Of Revolutions, Regime Change, and State Collapse in the Arab World by Marina Ottaway and David Ottaway

With breathtaking speed, massive popular protests across the Arab world have swept away two Arab strongmen and shaken half a dozen monarchies and republics to their core. But the Arab world has yet to witness any fundamental change in ruling elites and even less in the nature of governance.

Libya now seems poised to be the first country to see a true change in governance, thanks to Muammar Qaddafi’s megalomania and his amorphous jamahiriya (state of the masses). But such change may not have a happy ending. The damage Gaddafi has inflicted on his country is likely to extend well past his demise because he leaves behind a weak state without functioning institutions.

The uprisings sweeping across the Middle East have similar causes and share certain conditions: authoritarian and ossified regimes, economic hardship, and a growing contrast between great wealth and dire poverty, all worsened by the extraordinarily large number of young people who demand a better future. But the consequences will not be the same everywhere.

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2011/02/26

In Egypt, Army Starts To Get Tougher


A rally that brought over 100,000 demonstrators to Egypt’s Tahrir Square was dispersed this morning by Egyptian soldiers firing in the air and using batons and tasers against demonstrators who were demanding that the Hosni Mubarak cabinet be purged by the country’s new military leaders.

Egyptians had gathered in Tahrir Square to celebrate the two week mark since Mubarak’s removal and to remind the military rulers now in charge of its commitments to the people at the time of Mubarak’s ouster.

One of the commitments was to install a team of technocrats to replace the Mubarak-appointed cabinet. Activists are using the demonstrations to guard against “counter-revolution” of the people’s power.

But after midnight, demonstrators said the military fired in the air, shut off the light from lamp posts, and moved in on protesters to force them to leave the square, in an unusual use of military force against protesters since Mubarak’s fall.

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2011/02/21

Egypt’s Prosecutor Seeks Mubarak Loot

Egypt’s public prosecutor on Monday told the foreign ministry to seek a freeze on the foreign assets of Hosni Mubarak and his family, the first sign that the former president would be held to account by the military leadership to whom he handed power.

The prosecutor said in a statement he had asked the foreign ministry to use diplomatic channels to request a freeze on foreign assets and accounts held by Mubarak, his wife Suzanne and his two sons, Gamal and Alaa, together with their wives.

A legal representative for Mubarak denied media reports that the former president had amassed enormous wealth in office, the official MENA news agency reported Sunday.

Additional posts on this site regarding Mubarak’s wealth are here and here.

Complete article via Reuters

2011/02/18

Egypt Military May Block Free Economy

The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts. Its divisions make television sets, jeeps, washing machines, wooden furniture and olive oil, as well as bottled water under a brand reportedly named after a general’s daughter, Safi.

From this vast web of businesses, the military pays no taxes, employs conscripted labor, buys public land on favorable terms and discloses nothing to Parliament or the public.

Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some scholars, economists and business groups say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, discouraging changes that some argue are crucial if Egypt is to emerge as a more stable, prosperous country.

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2011/02/18

Battle Lines Harden Across Mideast, Africa


Security forces and government supporters employed a growing panoply of violent force — from tear gas and batons to shotguns and grenades — in pitched street battles with anti-government protesters in Libya, Bahrain and Yemen on Friday.

The clashes followed a week of deepening unrest as protesters, emboldened by the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt and President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in Tunisia, have called for swift revolutions in their own countries. The battle lines between protesters and authoritarian rulers across the Arab world appeared to be hardening, with governments turning to an increasingly brutal script in trying to quash the protests that have swept the region.

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2011/02/18

Egypt’s Missing Raise Doubts About Army

Ramadan Aboul Hassan left his house one night about three weeks ago to join a neighborhood watch group with two friends and did not return. The next time their relatives saw the three men they were emerging Wednesday night from a maximum security prison, 400 miles from home, run by Egypt’s military. Some family members said they bore signs of torture, though others denied it.

While many here have cheered the military for taking over after last week’s ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and for pledging to oversee a transition to democracy, human rights groups say that in the past three weeks the military has also played a documented role in dozens of disappearances and at least 12 cases of torture — trademark practices of the Mubarak government’s notorious security police that most here hoped would end with his exit.

Some, like Mr. Aboul Hassan and his two friends, were not released until several days after the revolution removed Mr. Mubarak.

Now human rights groups say the military’s continuing role in such abuses raises new questions about its ability to midwife Egyptian democracy.

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2011/02/17

Justice Begins: Egypt Arrests Ex-Ministers

An Egyptian prosecutor on Thursday ordered the detention of three ex-ministers and a prominent businessman pending trial on suspicion of wasting public funds.

The prosecutor dealing with financial crimes said former Interior Minister Habib el-Adli, former Tourism Minister Zuhair Garana, former Housing Minister Ahmed el-Maghrabi and steel magnate Ahmed Ezz must be held for 15 days. All four have denied any wrongdoing.

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2011/02/17

Lebanon’s Rivals See What They Want

by Michael Young, author of The Ghosts of Martyrs Square: An Eyewitness Account of Lebanon’s Life Struggle

Although Hizbollah and Iran hailed the ouster of the Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak as a political defeat for their enemies, it is not at all certain that Sunnis in some parts of the Arab world, particularly in Lebanon, were distressed by the transformations in Cairo.

Iran’s satisfaction, and that of its Arab followers, derived from a short-term appraisal that Mr Mubarak’s departure was a setback for the United States. However, nothing yet indicates that Washington has “lost” Egypt. In fact, America’s regional role may be strengthened if its Arab friends become more democratic, or just more pluralistic. After all, the protests in Tunisia and Egypt confirmed the deep detestation for – and therefore the fragility of – an American-led network of regional alliances resting on a foundation of despotism.

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2011/02/17

Barbie: We’re All Egyptians Now


For more Barbie – at least the stressed-out, westernized version of Barbie – go here and here

2011/02/16

Egypt: Some Protesters Still Unaccounted

Ed. Note: Not everyone has returned from Tahrir Square. This website is making an urgent personal plea to the Egyptians that come here every hour: Please demand an accounting of your comrades. It is up to you to protect the honor of your Revolution by demanding and receiving a complete accounting of those who stood with you.

“Perhaps he has been killed, he has been injured, he has been detained,” says his father, Mohammed Bakir, at home in the neighborhood of Mohandiseen.

Mohammed says he visited all the hospitals and morgues of Cairo, looking for his son, Ziad Bakir, but found nothing.

Ziad, a 37-year-old father of three, is a graphic designer who was not much interested in politics. But conscious, in late January, that something hugely important was happening.

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2011/02/16

How Egypt Found Internet’s ‘Off’ Button

In the Egyptian Revolution, the mobilizing power of the Internet was one of the opposition’s most potent weapons. But quickly lost in the swirl of revolution was the government’s ferocious counterattack, a dark achievement that many had thought impossible in the age of global connectedness. Just after midnight on Jan. 28, a technologically advanced country with more than 20 million people online was essentially severed from the global Internet.

The blackout was lifted after just five days, and it did not save Hosni Mubarak. But it has mesmerized the worldwide technical community and raised concerns that with unrest coursing through the Middle East, other autocratic governments – many of them already known to interfere with and filter specific Web sites and e-mails — may also possess what is essentially a kill switch for the Internet.

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2011/02/16

US Reporter Was Sexually Attacked In Egypt During Tahrir Square Celebration


CBS News’ Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Lara Logan, was subjected to “a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating” while covering the Egyptian protests, according to a statement released by CBS News today.

The CBS statement said “on the day Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak stepped down, CBS correspondent Lara Logan was covering the jubilation in Tahrir Square for a ’60 Minutes’ story when she and her team and their security were surrounded by a dangerous element amidst the celebration.

Complete article via World Scene Today

2011/02/15

Leaders Are Gone, But Regimes Are Not


The Presidents Left, the Regimes are Still Here
by Marina Ottaway, Carnegie Middle East Center

The removal from power of Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak were historic moments for the entire Arab world. But the old regimes—the submerged icebergs of personal connections, institutions, and common interests of which the presidents and their immediate entourage were the visible tips—are still there and they are fighting back to retain as much power and control as they can. These are still only the early days of a long process of transition, but it is clear that the battle to disband the regimes will be difficult. In this battle, street protest remains essential.

Early moves by the members of Egypt’s Supreme Council of the Armed Forces suggest that it intends to preserve as much of the regime as it possibly can. It has announced that the present government, composed entirely of Mubarak appointees, will remain in power until the end of a transition period lasting a maximum of six months. It has dissolved the parliament and abrogated the constitution, measures demanded by the opposition because last year’s parliamentary elections were rigged to the point of absurdity and the constitution was designed to protect the regime from real competition and perpetuate its power.

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2011/02/15

Brzezinski Discusses Unrest In Mideast

Former US National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski’s comments on the Egyptian Revolution and the US response, as well as the spreading unrest throughout the region.


Vodpod videos no longer available.
2011/02/15

In Egypt, Even The Mummies Are Free!

2011/02/14

80 Million Egyptians Disagreed, Mr. Biden


Q: Should Mubarak be seen as a dictator?

“I would not refer to him as a dictator.”

US Vice President Joe Biden
January 27, 2011

Source: PBS NewsHour

In the video version, the remark takes place at the 3:54 mark. Also, if you want to see Hillary Clinton’s stupid comment, it’s here.

Vodpod videos no longer available.
2011/02/13

Not All Squares Are Identical

2011/02/13

Egypt’s Military Dissolves Parliament

Egypt’s Supreme Council of the Armed Forces announced today on state TV that it is dissolving the country’s parliament, suspending the constitution and is calling for called for elections in six months.

“[The military] is looking forward to a peaceful transition for a free democratic system to permit an elected civil authority to be in charge of the country to build a democratic free nation,” said military spokesman General Mohsen el-Fangari on state television.

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